Browsed by
Tag: international economics with justice

Doha Round

Doha Round

That the proposals to reduce farm subsidies were not serious is shown by the recent U.S. approval of a law regulating agricultural subsidies. That law prevents the reduction of subsidies in the interest of fair international trade. While U.S. farmers are benefiting from high prices and have considerable agricultural income (an average of almost $ 90,000 per farm per year), Congress has increased farm subsidies and allowed to return to cotton subsidies, illegal subsidy under WTO . For its part, Europe insisted on exemptions for its sugar, meat and milk, while in fact denied to poor countries that international trade could be a means of fighting poverty. The EU also called for concessions on their exports to non-agricultural market, concessions which would have meant negative consequences for the industrial sectors of developing countries and therefore its citizens. After learning of the failure of the Doha Round, Oxfam said “It would be outrageous to suggest even that poor countries are somehow guilty of it has been impossible to reach an agreement.

If the EU and the United States had submitted proposals to the height of its promises, it would have been agreed. But have demanded harsh concessions from developing countries in return for quite illusory reforms (…). Offers rich countries have been inadequate, subject to the granting of compensatory measures in the trade in industrial goods from poor countries. In a situation of rising prices, like the present, developing countries have done well to defend their small farmers. ” The president of Bolivia, Evo Morales, wondered if a recent letter in the center of the negotiations of the Doha Round were economic development, alleviating poverty, the needs of the people and increasing opportunities for countries impoverished for a fair international trade agreement. Of course not. Once again, rich countries have shown moral turpitude. Or change the conscience of the rich countries and international trade will never be justice. Neither justice. Xavier Cano Tamayo Journalist and writer